Let Greg Kuhn, the Law of Attraction Science Guy, Teach You How to Hack Material Reality
Oct. 10, 2022

Be Manifested How You Really Want

Be Manifested How You Really Want

Greg Kuhn manifested his new business partner, Jay Smith, when he got to Love and Ecstasy at the top of his Emotional Reference Chart (in his latest use of his belief-raising process to align his beliefs with his desires to manifest his next book).  Jay joins Greg on this episode for a discussion about what it's like to be manifested.  And how to best prepare yourself to be manifested as you really want.

Transcript
Microphone (Samson Q2U Microphone):

Welcome to MANIFEST the Big Stuff. Thank you for joining me If you've been following along, you know I've chronicled my latest trip up my Emotional Reference Chart. Using my unique belief raising process to align my beliefs with my desires to write my next book. I began my latest use of my belief raising process at the emotional perspective of worry and nervousness. And guess what? I'm at the top of my Emotional Reference Chart having deliberately written and lived my way up to love an ecstasy. Today's episode is themed upon this because, when I got to love and ecstasy on my Emotional Reference Chart, I manifested something big. Something I've needed since I began this podcast last January. I manifested my business partner: Jay Smith. Owner of the Louisville-based web design company, Root of PI. From the new emotional perspective of love and ecstasy, I could see and understand the value jay brings to my business. And I could also clearly see and understand my need for his help. Right now. It was time. Jay Smith is not a Law of Attraction guy. But he is a big fan of MANIFEST the Big Stuff and what we are doing here. Jay is fascinated with bringing MANIFEST the Big Stuff fully to life with me. More about that in a moment. When I shared with Jay that I manifested him, he said, "Well, you should have me on the podcast to talk about that." And that sounded interesting, so Jay is joining me today as my guest. To talk about himself. And his business. And what it's like to be manifested. Especially as such a valuable partner. Before we get into our conversation, however, I first want to share some exciting news. About what Jay and I are cooking up for you. From the emotional perspective of love and ecstasy I am already in the thrall of writing my next book. With the working title: "A Handbook for Those Already Born," the quantum field is speaking through me, as I watch it flow out of my hand. That's right. When I'm writing from a place of aligned beliefs, I am often as much spectator as author! Because I often watch in amazement as my hand moves the pen across paper and the ink forms words right in front of my eyes. Additionally, I am currently creating online courses for you. So you can take a deeper dive into every aspect of my new book! I am super excited about manifesting all this. Almost as much as I am to eventually share it all with you. And to do all this, I need to scale back the frequency of MANIFEST the Big Stuff episodes. As much as I love making MANIFEST the Big Stuff for you, I need to direct more of my time and energy to writing my new book. And creating my courses. So, please, expect new episodes of MANIFEST the Big Stuff to be published once or twice a month. At least for the time being. Which makes it all the more important for you to subscribe to my newsletter. By going to my website: whyquantumphysicists.com. And downloading a free copy of my life-changing foundational book: "How Reversing Seven Words Can Change Your Life." And subscribing to my YouTube channel. By clicking the red "Subscribe" button in the lower right-hand corner of my videos. Do either, or both, and you'll be sure not to miss new episodes when I dropped them. Also make sure you stay tuned today after my conversation with Jay Smith. My Quantum Tip today has two substantial change agents. Life hacks, if you will. I'm going to reveal two of my most empowering takeaways yet from my new emotional perspective of love and ecstasy. You do not want to miss them! I'm Greg Kuhn, by the way. The "Law of Attraction Science Guy." Or "The World's Most Regimented Mystic." Take your pick. I'm the author of the life-changing "Why Quantum Physicists..." book series. And your host. I'm really excited for you to meet Jay Smith. So let's get started!

Greg Kuhn:

Welcome. My guest today is Jay Smith, who is now working with me on my business, helping me manifest the big stuff for you. Since I started working with Jay, I guess about two weeks ago now, I have been straight up making moves and I'm excited to talk with him today. Jay, please say hello.

Jay Smith:

Hello. It's a pleasure to be here.

Greg Kuhn:

That was a great hello. Let me introduce Jay Smith to you. Jay is the owner of Root of Pi, a Louisville-based creative website design company, offering search engine optimization, hosting, reputation management, and development solutions for small businesses. Root of Pi, only works with small businesses in Kentuckiana. And that's because Jay is really committed to getting to know the businesses that he works with. Getting to know them as intimately as possible so that he can uncover the right solutions for them. And I've seen that. I've seen it, Jay. You do learn about a business thoroughly when you work with them. You became a huge help to me, as soon as we started working together. In fact, this, the vodcast, this is your idea. And, boy, is it a great one! I love it! Jay, tell us about your investigative approach to working with businesses. How do you do that? What sorts of things do you do?

Jay Smith:

Gosh, that's tough because the answer is so ridiculously simple. I try to pare down my talking portion of discovery to as close to 5% or less as possible. When I do initial discovery or when we have our first meetings and we start figuring out what we're gonna do, the more I can allow the client to just talk through what they're doing and what's important to them and why it's important. Sometimes they will come to the answers before I can. And I've found the less I talk, the better result we get.

Greg Kuhn:

So it's a little like being a therapist

Jay Smith:

In some cases. Yeah. It could probably tip toe on that line. I do have a psychology degree, so...

Greg Kuhn:

You're putting it to use to good use I will say. Jay, you are more than a successful business owner. You work to make your community a better place. And before we get into the heart of our discussion, I'd like to share a little bit more about who you are. I hope you don't mind.

Jay Smith:

That's okay.

Greg Kuhn:

You created a malware analysis workshop for teens in Louisville. You created cybersecurity workshops for the Girl Scouts of Kentuckiana, so they could get their cybersecurity badges. How cool is that? You have mentored adults changing careers, working with Code Louisville. You're also part of the very first anti-human trafficking initiative hackathon. For over five years, you've worked directly with the Jefferson County Public Schools and Louisville's Catholic school system to teach students about cybersecurity, coding, and online safety. At over 20 schools here in the area. You are a volunteer advocate at the Center for Women and Families. You're also a US Army veteran. And graduating from the University of Louisville while working full-time on a truck dock is one of your proudest personal accomplishments. I'm guessing you don't watch a whole lot of television, do you, Jay? Have you always worked so hard and stayed so busy?

Jay Smith:

Yes, but it wasn't as focused. Took me a long time, 20 some years of just hacking away and poking at things and figuring out what my path was. A lot of it was a random, rabbit hole type stuff.

Greg Kuhn:

But this is a rabbit hole, if you will, that has proven very fruitful I take it. Because you're quite good at what you do. And you do seem to derive a lot of joy from it.

Jay Smith:

Absolutely. Yeah. I found my niche, with small business owners. Once I became an entrepreneur and just saw the big gap in the market for services for microbusinesses and small businesses. And it's really exciting to help somebody start expanding and realizing their dream.

Greg Kuhn:

Well, I can tell you that it's really exciting to be helped to expand and realize my dream.

Greg Kuhn (2):

This is how Jay describes himself.

Greg Kuhn:

He says, "I'm always learning, tinkering, and poking at the soft edges of everything that I can find to optimize what we're building together. Whether to replace it with something faster, more affordable, or more effective." Jay says, "I am your partner for as long as I can bring you value. And I'm willing to bet on myself that will be a long term relationship. I am as passionate about your business as I am about my own." That's a big statement! "And I deeply enjoy solving problems." Is that still an accurate description Jay?

Jay Smith:

A hundred percent.

Greg Kuhn:

Fantastic. I am going to share our screen for a moment, because there's actually an endorsement that sold me on Jay, much more readily even than his own words. This is an artist's website. A very talented and hardworking artist. You can see from the initial foray into her collection here. And, Jay, you created this website.

Jay Smith:

I'll actually push back on that a little.

Greg Kuhn:

Okay.

Jay Smith:

Shawn did all the work on this website. I just helped point Shawn in the right direction and guided her with any technical questions she had, but she did all the work on this.

Greg Kuhn:

Well, In case our viewers don't know Shawn Marshall is my wife, an incredibly talented and hardworking artist. And Shawn is the one who really pointed me in your direction, Jay. In fact, let me read her endorsement of you: "Jay Smith, of Root of Pi, helped me set up a brand new website in no time. He is professional and extremely knowledgeable in digital marketing and website set up." Jay, isn't it great when someone else says it for you? How gratifying is it to receive testimonials like that?

Jay Smith:

It's honestly, it's one of those things that starts, triggering that, imposter syndrome to be perfectly honest. It's tough. It's tough to hear it. I hear it at BNI occasionally with people I work with too. It's lovely a nd it's wonderful to get that validation for your efforts. but it does it, it's almost you've lived in a vacuum of that your whole life and when people start doing it, you're like, "Ah, is that real?"

Greg Kuhn:

So is it fair to say that you wake up each morning wanting to prove to yourself that you are who they say you are?

Jay Smith:

Oh, absolutely. Yeah.

Greg Kuhn:

Jay, I know that, when we really started getting underway, or worked together, I shared with you that I manifested you. I manifested you when I got to the top of my Emotional Reference Chart, which is a hierarchy of emotions, starting from the most painful and then ending at the most joyous. But I want to ask you, you existed before I manifested you, correct?

Jay Smith:

I hope so. But I've seen enough, Matrix movies that could all be a fabrication.

Greg Kuhn:

Okay.

Jay Smith:

I could just be convinced of it.

Greg Kuhn:

You know what? That's good enough for me. Let's say that you did exist.

Jay Smith:

I did.

Greg Kuhn:

You did exist prior to my manifesting you. However, for me to manifest you, in my version of reality, I needed to be able to see and understand the value that you bring to the table, for my business. And I needed to see and understand my need for it as well. And from my perspective, as soon as I was able to see and understand that, I manifested you. How does it feel to be manifested like that?

Jay Smith:

It's interesting. If your timing was off by a year, we never would've met and I would've still been a private investigator working cybersecurity. So yeah, it's definitely, it's fascinating,

Greg Kuhn:

However we decide we wanna quantify how those dots were connected, I'm a firm believer that, for much of our lives, we don't even realize just how connected we are in the moment. And oftentimes only see that in arrears, as we're looking back and say, "Wow, look at how everything connected." Jay we've talked enough. You know how we manifest here at MANIFEST the Big Stuff. So number one: every human manifests their own unique version of reality, A version of reality so unique that it would not exist without you manifesting it. And that's pretty special. Number two: there's no opt out of number one.

Jay Smith:

Hmm.

Greg Kuhn:

Whether you know you're manifesting your version of reality, whether you believe you're manifesting your version of reality, manifesting a version of reality is what humans do. In fact, I'd go so far as to say it like this: if you weren't manifesting your own unique version of reality, there would be no reality. not for you. And then number three: you get to choose how you manifest your unique version of reality. You can manifest by default, maintaining the status quo. Or you can manifest more intentionally, shaking up the status quo. Now, Jay, I am highly motivated to help other people manifest their desires. I'm eager to shake up the status quo in order to do that. Working with you is definitely shaking up my status quo. And in fact, manifesting you, it made me start thinking about the film, Everything, Everywhere, All at Once. Have you seen that movie?

Jay Smith:

I have gotten a third into it and I got disrupted and I have not, I had not gotten back to it and I'm a huge Michelle Yo fan. So I've been looking forward to it, but I don't, I have to actually go in the basement to watch TV and it's so it's kinda like I don't do it.

Greg Kuhn:

Gotcha. Is Michelle plays Evelyn I believe, correct?

Jay Smith:

Yeah. She's the lead.

Greg Kuhn:

Everything, Everywhere, All at Once, for those who haven't seen it, it's a movie by Dan Kwon and Daniel Scheinert. Their previous film this is their second film their previous one, is called Swiss Army Man. Have you seen Swiss Army Man?

Jay Smith:

I haven't seen it. I've heard of it, but I have not seen that.

Greg Kuhn:

It is a really cool film. Daniel Radcliffe stars as a flatulent corpse. And it's a lot better than it sounds, okay. But, yes, very much worth your time. Everything, Everywhere, All at Once. You've seen enough then to know the concept

Jay Smith:

mm-hmm

Greg Kuhn:

that it's a movie about the multiverse In this movie, there are an infinite number of timelines. Each inhabited by a unique version of you that doesn't know any of the other ones exist. In every moment, new timelines, new universes, are created from all the choices you don't make. And then each choice you don't make splinters off and continues with a completely different version of you in it, living that version's life until the end of the life. And then the main character, Evelyn, learns that there's a particular timeline where the humans have discovered how to jump into versions of themselves in any other timeline. And, even more excitingly, they can borrow any unique skills, abilities, and traits of any of their other versions. For example, if one version of Jay Smith, in the infinite timelines of Jay Smith that exist, has a black belt, you could reach for that version of Jay Smith, grab his black belt, grab his martial arts skills, and you instantly have all of his ability. I told Shawn, after we finished watching the movie, that it really inspired me to think about living my life in a way that another Greg would wanna borrow one of my skills, abilities or traits. Because I'd gotten so good at it. Jay. I don't know if this is really occurring or if it's just in the movie, but if there is another Jay out there that's capable of borrowing skills, abilities and traits, what do you think are your most important traits, abilities, skills?

Jay Smith:

It's mostly just problem solving. You know, no matter what the problem is, whether it's soft or hard, it's the ability to go and find the answer or bang on the keyboard until I figure it out. And I've done it for so long that I've honed it down to where I can't even explain what I'm doing to people. Which is a detriment when you're an entrepreneur, because I need to systematize, but I'm so much faster at doing it.

Greg Kuhn:

I understand. Are you identifying problem solving because it's played a very impactful role in your success as a business person?

Jay Smith:

Absolutely.

Greg Kuhn:

And a human being.

Jay Smith:

Yeah. Yeah. and to talk about the first time we met together, and I don't want to derail us, but, you know, we talked. manifestation and things like that and it brought to mind 25 years ago when I was a Private in the Army. And I had a Sergeant First Class who taught me something I've never forgotten and it's along the same lines only presented differently. And it was, the reason why we maintained this equipment every single day. The reason why we prepare and we constantly learn to put on our gas mask and take it off The reason why we go, the reason why we do all of these things constantly, nonstop, is to create space, within, so we have room to account for things that happen. You say, "When we meet the enemy on the battlefield, their equipment's gonna break down. Their morale is gonna be lower. All these thousand little things that they didn't apply for because they didn't create enough space." And that's what I try to do when I work with people. It's like, whatever is just junk and noise, let's try and push that out so we have room to create and to make this so much better, even if we don't know where that's going.

Greg Kuhn:

Interesting. You're making me think about one of Louisville's most renowned thespians, a gentleman named Billy Bradford, who taught for, oh gosh, three decades at Louisville's Youth Performing Arts School. He told me one time that, and I will try to imitate his voice. He has a very, Shakespearean, dialect. He would say, "An actor must learn the script verbatim so that he can throw it out." You know what else? When you said that it made me think about, a story I heard on NPR a couple years ago about why the aviation industry is such a safe place to work. Why it's so safe to fly in airplanes. It's because of checklists and what I take away from that is the checklist gives you the mental space, the mental energy, of freeing yourself from worrying whether you, covered everything you had to cover. You have a protocol to do that automatically and it frees you up. So is it essentially what you're saying, Jay?

Jay Smith:

Yeah, pretty much. It's been echoed in many different ways by other people that I've been around. A very smart manager I knew at GE a couple years back, we were having a usual, you know, there's some things going wrong and there's millions of different factors. And he said, let me just clarify this really. Said at every point that we're not following the established procedure, we have no idea and we will have no idea what's going wrong. It's the procedure for a reason. You follow that and then you can find out what the exception is. What's the problem? Much like math, much like science, much like anything else, if you follow the guideline, then you can see where something's going wrong. If you're just winging it, which I'm very guilty of, then it's more difficult to pinpoint what's not going correctly.

Greg Kuhn:

Organize what we can organize. right? In fact, I told Shawn after, when I came home after our talk that, I was now thinking of myself as the world's most regimented mystic. And it does help. It does help to have that mindset. Although really following up, Jay, two, questions that come immediately to mind. One is, were you born this way? Were you always this way? And then, second, how closely, do you associate what you've described with the, uh, psychological or educational term Lifelong learner.

Jay Smith:

I don't know that I was always like this. I was always a very, introverted, shy little child. I was, I skipped grades. I was held back because I was too small then. I was bullied picked on, and then, At some point, the genetic predisposition towards extroversion and aggressiveness that my father always displayed, even though I was never around him, just popped open when I turned 17 or so. So it's been a big change. Lifelong learner. I don't know because I don't, um, that's tough cuz when I think of that term, it seems to have these academic walls fall around it where, oh, "Well then I want to go get this degree, which has these other things around it." While I appreciate, you know, structured education and a degree or a certificate or something like that, what I enjoy about constantly learning now is picking what I want to learn. And getting excited about something. And unfortunately, again, if you take that too far, that's called a rabbit hole. Or a new obsession or whatever, and we're all guilty of it. It's "shiny object syndrome" as we call it a lot in entrepreneur circles. So you have to temper that. You have to know your limitations and your ability to... sometimes I have to take a hard look at something and go, this is not gonna bring value to me or my clients. I can't pursue this.

Greg Kuhn:

Wasn't it Mark Twain who said, "Don't ever let school get in the way of your education"?

Jay Smith:

Yeah and people like Seth Goden have, they've really pointed out the big flaws in our system. And it hasn't changed in a long time. And now it's politicized. Have fun with that.

Greg Kuhn:

Yeah. Yeah. You've mentioned the term rabbit hole a number of times and it really brings to mind, I'm starting to picture you, as a Jack Russell Terrier. If you've ever been around if any of our viewers haven't, Jack Russell Terriers love to, literally, go down rabbit holes. Which can be a little scary when you're house sitting and were told not to let one outta the house. And it goes down a rabbit hole. I'm speaking purely hypothetically of course Jay, I'm not gonna sit here and say, "Oh, you're a finished product." Of course not, but I don't manifest junk. I will ask you a follow up question: while you may not have been innately instilled with some of these characteristics right from birth, in what ways have you cultivated them? What do you do? What have you done that, fosters and promotes this type of mindset?

Jay Smith:

I appreciated early on, it's a pretty well known trope now and it probably is something I learned in the army because I was an instructor for a while, and that is you learn the most when you're teaching. Without a doubt if you really need to get a concept and build a workshop around it and teach it to people. And I pride myself when I send a loom video to a potential client or an existing client, going through their website or going through what may be going wrong, I regularly hear, "Nobody's ever said it like that. I understand what you're saying." And I take great pride in doing that because, as a digital marketer, as being in that field, it's easy for people to, "Oh, here comes the music man. You know just tell me what money to throw at it and maybe it'll work. I don't know." So I try, I do everything I can to overcome that because my goal is not to just take as much money as I can from a client. It's for them to succeed. That's really satisfying.

Greg Kuhn:

And if they don't understand or if they don't, if they don't get it...,

Jay Smith:

Then I'm not doing something correctly because, or I'm trying to get them to fix something that's so ridiculously esoteric that we really don't need to be fixing it. If it's not, if it's not understandable then, or should you really be fixing it?

Greg Kuhn:

True. The adage that if the student isn't learning, let's look at how the student's being taught.

Jay Smith:

Absolutely.

Greg Kuhn:

I can appreciate that Your focus on seeking to be understood, seeking to inform, to help, to educate, rather than to amaze, astound. I mean, it's very entertaining. I enjoy chatting with you, but I also know that's not your primary objective when we're talking. In fact, I would say, Jay, you remind me a lot of myself. I know, early on, I mentioned to Shawn that, "Wow. Jay is a lot like me only a lot more skilled." In the things you're skilled in. I would say that you're always thinking. I can just see it in your eyes when we're talking. you're always playing ,and I can vouch for this too, based on texts and emails, you're always playing: how can we make it better? And, boy, do you remind me of myself in that regard. When you do that, I'm a firm believer that you are always creating good opportunities to be a self that another Jay might wanna borrow from. And a self that future Jay is gonna be happy with. That's pretty important.

Jay Smith:

Yep.

Greg Kuhn:

And a self and here's where I come in or our interaction as we've started to work together and you're creating the best possibilities to manifest a self that different kinds of people wanna work with. And you've touched on this already, but let me just ask it directly. What drives you to do this?

Jay Smith:

Gosh, it comes natural to me, but once I was able to apply it, because I've been hacking on a computer my entire life, but once I was able to apply it and saw that from an entrepreneur's mindset and taking all of the things that I knew that you could use for automation to find profitability from within or to expand your reach without, honestly, it's just an extension of more and more problem solving. But now I'm doing it extraneously to other people and I'm getting involved in them and they get such a rush and a thrill when something happens and we've taken something that no one's ever mentioned or they've never thought of, and we just break it wide open and they can do something really cool. And it's just, it's awesome. I enjoy the heck out of it.

Greg Kuhn:

You have to ask important questions to get to that place, don't you?

Jay Smith:

Absolutely. Yeah.

Greg Kuhn:

So listening is got to be an integral component.

Jay Smith:

Oh yeah.

Greg Kuhn:

But listening, without asking those questions, that's only half the equation. Were you always unafraid to ask important questions?

Jay Smith:

Yes. Yeah, I, uh, even as I think it was a six or seven year old, I diverted from organized religion pretty quickly when nobody could explain the lack of dinosaurs in the Bible to me, I, to this day, remember just what, why can't anybody? Sunday school, nobody can anybody. There's nothing?

Greg Kuhn:

I think there's an insert for that.

Jay Smith:

Oh, okay. It's the addendum. The 2023 edit.

Greg Kuhn:

So the lack of dinosaurs blew it for you.

Jay Smith:

It wasn't just that, but it was the hand waving of the answer. Someone talking to a seven year old, like, oh, you know, it's because Jesus didn't want dinosaurs in the book. You know, just making things up rather than saying, "That's a good question; we should find out what the answer to that is because somewhere somebody has discussed it." And so the "hand-wavy" answers, no matter what realm I'm in, I don't appreciate I don't like it. And I wouldn't do that to my clients. If there's a genuine curiosity about something or "Hey, can we try this?" and in many cases, it's something I know very well about and it's not the right answer for them. I'll discuss why that is, with the understanding that, if you wanna try that, I will still try that in the best way we can. But here are several reasons why maybe this isn't the right time or that's not the right platform.

Greg Kuhn:

I hear you. I'm of the mindset that if we're not gonna try to manifest the big stuff, then what are we doing here? And that's me. And furthermore, if I'm not going to be able to do it and then show you how to do it, then why would you listen to me?

Jay Smith:

Yeah,

Greg Kuhn:

I like to do things publicly. I like to explain things practically and, I, you know, I am who I am, of course. And, that really leads me to think about another component of this. And that is, Jay, I did manifest you. But you also manifested me. And so am I a product of higher alignment on your part? Or did I just appear?

Jay Smith:

No. I think it's, it hasn't been quite a year, but it's been some time since I worked with Shawn. And Shawn came to me through a referral with a partner I work with now heavily. Where, at the time, my relationship with them, that Director of marketing company, it was brand new. And Shawn and I, although I didn't build her a website, we did just, we communicated quite a bit. I worked with her, got to really know about her art and stuff like that. Stayed connected with her on LinkedIn followed, you know, was sure to promote her stuff and all that. And then, sure enough, having no expectation, because I had listened to your podcast when Shawn mentioned to it, but I had never, you know, "Oh, I'm listening to this so I can go sell this guy website or do his SEO" or something like that. It was just, "Hey, this is really interesting!" And that all goes back to why I work with small business owners, because I am so effective at what I do, because I get in deep with them and get excited and find out why they're passionate about this thing. And because I was so close to Shawn and why she was so passionate about her art, I just happened to mention that my favorite artist was Marc Chagall because her style is close to something like that. It was all those things in concert where if it was just transactional, "Okay, here's some advice, gimme some money, and peace out, I'll go find another one." What is exciting or fun about that? That's transactional. I could get a job anywhere doing that.

Greg Kuhn:

Yeah, exactly. Am I hearing you correctly? You are 100% intentional about manifesting a version of Jay Smith that is going to be able to meet the needs of interesting people and businesses that you, come into contact with. Do you employ any intentionality? And I did hear you, you know, obviously you mentioned, something like LinkedIn mm-hmm and, while we may not always be in the habit of quantifying it like this: being an active participant on LinkedIn is a way of being intentional about manifesting great clients. So what ways are you intentional, in regards to attracting or manifesting really good clients that are gonna be fun and fulfilling to work with?

Jay Smith:

I don't have it as structured sounding as that, but, like, Saturday, my wife and I went to, the Flea Off Market over in, Schnitzleburg. Cool little neighborhood right next to Monick brewery. And I probably talked to four microbusiness owners, all artists, uh, and I invited him to the Website Roast. I gave them my card and then I just talked to 'em about what their business was and found out. And of course my wheels are turning. I was like, "Oh, here we have somebody who creates snarky t-shirts and prints 'em in her own house. I have three other clients who could utilize her services." And then I can start putting small business owners together, instead of saying, "Just go on this website and buy whatever." Instead of doing that, "Why don't you work with this small business owner?" And just creating so much more awesomeness inside of our boundaries. We'll still get the same effect, but if you can do it by getting to know someone else who has an amazing story and an amazing business, those are the kind of things that I'm really intentional about. I don't have a funnel to get me the ideal clients. Along the lines of your science they tend to come, um, they do. Almost all of my work is referral based. I have had some cold outreach, but for the most part, it's people who I've already worked with, and I already know. And they're bringing me people they know that's

Greg Kuhn:

That's fantastic. We wouldn't want it any other way.

Jay Smith:

Yeah. Yeah, referral businesses is one of the best because, you know, it's all about know, like, and trust and you're already 30 to 40% through the barrier with three of those.

Greg Kuhn:

I can imagine. Well, how do you avoid letting the need for income, uh, intervene in a way that's not helpful? I mean, obviously money is one of the important, components for you or any business.

Jay Smith:

I'm just building this intentionally. So I'm being very intentional of not bringing on the wrong clients somebody who, generally, I can get the vibe right away that they've been burned many times. And sometimes that's because their expectations are not aligned with what can actually happen. So everything I'm doing with this business has grown very intentionally, But I also offload. I used to be the guy who would do every single thing and I I would go out and learn TikTok for you if I need to. And I would, I'll figure out how to do PPC ads. Not anymore. Now I have some very strong business partners for social media, advertising, and for things like that. And they're people that I have actually gotten to know. And if I have a new client, or an existing client, and I wanna try something new, I'll just try it with a new vendor if somebody's reach out to me on LinkedIn. Most of the time, if they perform and do it well, and they have the right outlook and the right demeanor, then I will continue working with them. And if not, then it was a lesson learned.

Greg Kuhn:

You make it sound a lot like dating.

Jay Smith:

It is. It's very much like dating.

Greg Kuhn:

Interesting.

Jay Smith:

And again, it's know, like, and trust. That's marketing. And everything is marketing.

Greg Kuhn:

With that metaphor, when I was single, I didn't go out on a date with the objective to get married. I went on the date with the objective to see if there's rapport, establish, communication, you know, feel out the vibe, just like you've described. Does that take some of the pressure off? If you will, of the matchmaking, because it seems to me, your focus is really on things that you're able to contribute quite a bit to.

Jay Smith:

Yeah. So it's a relationship. And even getting in the weeds, technically, with the way we structure your website. Your website visitor has about 50 milliseconds to decide if they like you yet. And if they don't like you, then there's a big hump you're gonna have to get over to get them to engage further with your website. And that's all visual. It's old brain. You have no control over it with the words you put on the page. But once they have engaged, the words on the page have to carry them through the story of their challenge. What do you solve for them? Another positive of working with people in this area and small business owners is I get to meet them face-to-face and not just have that conversation, but also rely heavily on those physical cues and those environmental cues. And how do they respond when somebody texts them or calls 'em while we're talking. Or how loud it is in there all those little micro things. And it's not that I'm sitting there diagnosing them. But it allows me to overcome that bridge of strangerhood or whatever we call it, where now I now have a relationship. You and I talked for two hours the first time we got together and learned more about you than I could have ever learned about you reading eight books, watching any video of you, or any of that. That's why it's important to me, to work with clients that I can actually meet.

Greg Kuhn:

One thing you can learn about me from reading the books, and from talking to me, very quickly is that I talk a lot.

Jay Smith:

That's good. That's good.

Greg Kuhn:

In this field, I suppose that could be considered a strength. At the dinner table not always

Jay Smith:

I can see it.

Greg Kuhn:

Oh gosh. And you know what? That's a good segue back to me, um, briefly, to say I've definitely been honing skills, abilities, and traits that will make me a great person to work with and through which I can manifest and create this business. To make it more effective. To allow more people to come to know how to manifest the big stuff. A lot of which has, unfortunately, been alluding them and creating some pain. We're all familiar with that. I, along with the rest of humanity, manifest myself. Just like I do with the rest of reality, I manifest myself. And we're all manifesting everything in our reality, including ourselves, by doing two things: we're making our reality apparent to our eyes and we're making it apparent to our understanding. So your version of reality is unique to you in form and function meaning how reality is apparent to your eyes. And it's also unique to you in meaning and value: i.e. How reality is apparent to your understanding. That's a lot of manifesting and I think it's easy sometimes to forget that we're manifesting ourself just as readily as anything else, but I can actually prove to you that you are manifesting yourself. Can I do that?

Jay Smith:

Sure.

Greg Kuhn:

Okay. We'll start with this proposition and it's more than a proposition. It is a fact. You are energy. You are energy that is temporarily experiencing human life in three-dimensional time-space. You're what we call a time-space event, a unique object in reality, that is separate, distinct from all else. Now, Jay, you are not made of energy. You are energy. The best way to illustrate that is if we take an atom... And everything's made of atoms, right? We can agree on that?

Jay Smith:

Mm-hmm

Greg Kuhn:

If you take an atom and you blow it up to the size of Yankee Stadium. That's a big atom. The nucleus of that atom is gonna be the size of a fly inside Yankee Stadium. And bear in mind that the nucleus of an atom is 99.9999999% of the tangible stuff, the stuff you could touch, the mass. The physical reality of an atom is the nucleus. So 99.9999999% of what makes us is empty space. We are energy. And I used to think, "Okay, an atom has a lot of empty space, but what if you got a whole bunch of 'em and jammed them together?" It would still be, it doesn't change it, right? It doesn't change that. You, energy, manifest Jay Smith, a self. So that your energy has a vehicle to walk around in and manipulate objects in three-dimensional time space. And when "this" is over, this temporary state, when your experience of human life is finished, your self, the human you manifested called Jay Smith? That's not gonna remain. That's gonna go away. But "YOU" will remain. Because energy can't be destroyed. So you can take that to the bank.

Jay Smith:

Awesome.

Greg Kuhn:

Good news.

Jay Smith:

It's fortunate,

Greg Kuhn:

Jay, before we go, I can't let this time pass without asking you, what do you see for the future of this business? What do you envision creating together when you imagine, when you dream, and when your desires take form? And how excited are you for that?

Jay Smith:

Talking about for MANIFEST the Big Stuff?

Greg Kuhn:

MANIFEST the Big Stuff!

Jay Smith:

Yeah, I mean, sky's the limit. You've got a very unique. message. I mean, I've heard of manifestation before, but it's a far different thing in your hands, with your credentials too, and the way you explain it., Like I mentioned, I take great pride in breaking things down so that they're palatable and understandable because that's huge and understanding and you do the same thing. Honestly, It's capped by how far you want to take it. If you want to go start doing Ted talks, if you wanna do all this, let's do it. Let's do everything. You know honestly, it's wherever your journey is taking you and we can... The good thing is I'm not afraid of any of those things and the more and bigger you want to get the more exciting it gets.

Greg Kuhn:

I love that. and what I also love is that you're gonna continue to tell me and share, honestly, your ideas, your suggestions, how we can make it better, things I ought to do. I can definitely tell you, moving to video took me way outta my comfort zone. You talk about shaking up the status quo, but, truthfully, I am loving it. I'm loving what we can do with it and how personable it is. The level of intimacy, the immediacy of the connection. The ability to convey and express even more readily than just the straight audio. I'm excited too. Apply those same things to your business? what do you envision for yourself?

Jay Smith:

Honestly, my goal is to grow it large enough that I can start employing people from Code Louisville adults who want to change careers and are learning how to do front end development. Eventually retiring to either Portugal or Central or South America and teach down there, teach kids how to do this stuff. Cuz the one thing that draws me with technology and with computers and with software is that you can literally create anything out of nothing. You don't have to have raw materials, you gotta have electricity. But other than that, it's imagination. And things that we would never have fathomed even being useful 20 years ago, like, oh, okay, a taxi I can get off my app that's driven by some person and I would never get into a stranger's car and pay for it. And sure enough, here we are. People thought that was a stupid idea. When Apple created the iPhone, like, nobody's gonna wanna do that. Nobody wants a smartphone. Okay. So, you know, it's exciting to just be a part of that and to help other people recognize that you can literally do anything. Until Skynet takes over, we can pretty much do whatever we want.

Greg Kuhn:

Skynet's not taking over.

Jay Smith:

Honestly, I believe you, because if they were going to, they would've. They probably left oh, we'll go find another one. This one's broke.

Greg Kuhn:

I've shared my hypothesis with you, haven't I?

Jay Smith:

I don't know if we talked about that or not.

Greg Kuhn:

I'm a firm believer that technology needs us just as much as we need technology.

Jay Smith:

Oh, yeah

Greg Kuhn:

That through us technology gets to experience biology. And without us, they don't. Why would they want us not to be there? We don't diminish them or take anything away from them or steal their joy or their thunder. And as far as I'm concerned, more and more we're assigning credit where credit is due. We're giving and sharing credit to our technology. I'm sure that you experience this much more, thoroughly than me technology is my partner now, even more than a tool.

Jay Smith:

Yeah,

Greg Kuhn:

I don't understand why technology would wanna violate that relationship. It's working very well, I think, for both of us. So that's my theory. Jay, I definitely. plan to keep you too busy to move to a... Are you, do you speak Spanish? Is that why you...

Jay Smith:

I was fluent as a youngster and now it comes back if I'm on vacation, and drinking, and I'm around native speakers. I can, get back in it pretty quick. But just sitting here, no. Like, it's very situational. I'm sure I can go find you a whole lot of psychology studies that just speak to, if you memorize 10 words underwater kind of thing. Sure.

Greg Kuhn:

The next time we talk we'll have you, have a bottle of bourbon beside you.

Jay Smith:

Well, you're gonna have to rent some native Spanish speakers too.

Greg Kuhn:

That's true.

Jay Smith:

Cause I have to, I just have to be immersed in it and it comes back pretty quick.

Greg Kuhn:

Wow. Yeah. Yeah. You're right there. that's a dissertation right there.

Jay Smith:

Mm-hmm

Greg Kuhn:

And a cool one at that.

Jay Smith:

But I also, it can't be intentional. Like I can't go into the Cuban deli that I love so much and just stand there for a few minutes and just conversing with them. It has to be pure, perfectly natural. So I have to be out of my head and just enjoying the moment and being around other people. And then it comes back.

Greg Kuhn:

Wow.

Jay Smith:

Programming

Greg Kuhn:

And like a superpower, too, is what it makes me think of.

Jay Smith:

Yeah. And that's why I'm so keen on doing so much work with Girl Scouts and with JCPS and all that, because technology and computers are just like a foreign language and music. Being exposed to it and getting as much exposure as you can as a child makes it so much easier to use as an adult. And that's why I really, bemoan the schools that I go in that don't have much.

Greg Kuhn:

I've got a very clear vision in my head of, other versions of Jay Smith reaching down into this timeline. And you've got a plethora of skills that they might want to grab. I didn't even know the Spanish skill.

Jay Smith:

Again...

Greg Kuhn:

That's a feather in the cap.

Jay Smith:

It's barely touching on skill.

Greg Kuhn:

You're trying to dissuade people from other timelines from borrowing it. I get it. You're downplaying it, but trust me, it could come in handy.

Jay Smith:

Yeah,

Greg Kuhn:

Definitely come in handy. Jay, it really has been a pleasure spending this time together. I believe we created something valuable with our time. For ourselves, for my business, for your business, for our friends watching and listening. Thank you very much for sharing your time with me today.

Jay Smith:

Thank you, Greg. This was awesome.

Greg Kuhn:

Yeah, and of course we'll be talking very soon, but it was great to spend the time this way today.

Jay Smith:

I agree.

Greg Kuhn:

All right, take care.

Jay Smith:

Thank you.

Microphone (Samson Q2U Microphone):

And now my Quantum Tip. I have two things to share with you here. First: One of the biggest changes from my new emotional perspective of love and ecstasy is my relationship with time. There is simply more time for me here. More time to make use of and take advantage of. Time is more of an ally from this emotional perspective. Here's what I mean. From love and ecstasy time is for inhaling. For input. I curate my input. I carefully construct how the way I'm spending my time informs and manifests my Self and the rest of my reality. And from here, time is also for exhaling. For output. I schedule mine. I carefully plan how the way I'm spending my time will contribute to manifesting desired versions of reality. And best make me an ally of "Future Greg." And here's a true life hack from love and ecstasy: Do you want to make better use of your time? Then give more of it To a mentee. To a nonprofit. charity. Not your money your time. Given in places where you're not paid to do it. Do that and your time immediately becomes more valuable. To you. And now the second thing I want to share with you today from love and ecstasy. The opportunities I see and understand here can feel a little overwhelming sometimes. Why? Because the greater the opportunity, the bigger the problem it's solving. That works in the other direction too. Which reveals today's second life hack. Do you want to spot great opportunities? Then find the biggest problems. Find the difficulties and challenges. And you've found the opportunities. Thank you for joining me today. I really value your time and energy. It's an important contribution to this project. As well as to my intentional manifesting journey. If you found value here. Please make sure you sign up for my newsletter. And subscribe to my YouTube channel. So you can stay in the loop about intentional manifesting. Until the next time we're together, I hope you make the most of the time you're given. And I'll give my best effort to do likewise.